Millennium Challenge Corporation

Millennium Challenge Corporation

The Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) is an innovative and independent U.S. foreign aid agency that is helping lead the fight against global poverty.

Created by the U.S. Congress in January 2004 with strong bipartisan support, MCC is changing the conversation on how best to deliver smart U.S. foreign assistance by focusing on good policies, country ownership, and results.

What is distinctive about MCC?

MCC is a prime example of smart U.S. Government assistance in action, benefiting both developing countries and U.S. taxpayers through:

  • Competitive selection: Before a country can become eligible to receive assistance, MCC’s Board examines its performance on independent and transparent policy indicators and selects compact-eligible countries based on policy performance.
  • Country-led solutions: MCC requires selected countries to identify their priorities for achieving sustainable economic growth and poverty reduction. Countries develop their MCC proposals in broad consultation within their society. MCC teams then work in close partnership to help countries refine a program.
  • Country-led implementation: MCC administers the Millennium Challenge Account (MCA). When a country is awarded a compact, it sets up its own local MCA accountable entity to manage and oversee all aspects of implementation. Monitoring of funds is rigorous and transparent, often through independent fiscal agents.

MCC forms partnerships with some of the world’s poorest countries, but only those committed to:

  • good governance,
  • economic freedom,
  • and investments in their citizens.

MCC provides these well-performing countries with large-scale grants to fund country-led solutions for reducing poverty through sustainable economic growth.  MCC grants complement other U.S. and international development programs.There are two primary types of MCC grants: compacts and threshold programs.

  • Compacts are large, five-year grants for countries that pass MCC’s eligibility criteria.
  • Threshold Programs are smaller grants awarded to countries that come close to passing these criteria and are firmly committed to improving their policy performance.

What is MCC achieving?

MCC has approved over $8.4 billion in compact and threshold programs worldwide that support country-determined projects in such sectors as:

  • agriculture and irrigation,
  • transportation (roads, bridges, ports),
  • water supply and sanitation,
  • access to health,
  • finance and enterprise development,
  • anticorruption initiatives,
  • land rights and access,
  • access to education.

The aggressive implementation of compacts and threshold programs is promoting growth opportunities, opening markets, raising the standard of living, and creating a more prosperous future for some of the world’s poorest people:

  • More than 148,000 farmers have been trained and more than 82,000 hectares of land are under production.
  • More than 4,900 kilometers of roads are under design, and road construction is underway.
  • Over $65 million has been disbursed in agricultural loans.

MCC is managed by a chief executive officer, who is part of the nine-member Board of Directors. The Secretary of State, the Secretary of the Treasury, the U.S. Trade Representative, and the USAID Administrator serve on the board along with four private sector representatives.

At a Glance

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Contact

875 Fifteenth Street NW
Washington, DC 20005-2221

T : +1 202-521-3600

Organization Mission

Our Values are CLEAR

MCC’s mission is to reduce poverty through economic growth.

Our model is defined by core principles, including selectivity, country ownership, transparency, and a focus on results. MCC’s values define how we behave on a daily basis, both as individuals and as an institution, in pursuit of our mission. Our values identify who we are and what is important to us. They guide how we make decisions, set priorities, address challenges, manage tradeoffs, recruit and develop staff, and work together with our country partners and stakeholders.

Embrace Collaboration
We work together toward clear, common goals with a spirit of creativity and teamwork. We believe that bringing different perspectives to the table leads to finding the best solutions.

Always Learn
We question assumptions and seek to understand what works, what   doesn’t and why. We recognize that failing to reach a goal can be an important source of learning, and we apply and share those lessons broadly.

Practice Excellence
We envision MCC as a leader in global development and we have high standards for ourselves, our partner countries and the investments we make. We bring out the best in ourselves and in each other to advance the fight against global poverty.

Be Accountable
We own our actions, are honest about our limits and missteps and hold ourselves and each other responsible for good performance. We are transparent and explain our decisions.

Respect Individuals and Ideas
We are inclusive, act with humility and value diverse ideas. We listen to each other and foster strong working relationships with our colleagues at MCC, in our partner countries and in the development community.

Area of Focus

What is distinctive about MCC?

MCC is a prime example of smart U.S. Government assistance in action, benefiting both developing countries and U.S. taxpayers through:

  • Competitive selection: Before a country can become eligible to receive assistance, MCC’s Board examines its performance on independent and transparent policy indicators and selects compact-eligible countries based on policy performance.
  • Country-led solutions: MCC requires selected countries to identify their priorities for achieving sustainable economic growth and poverty reduction. Countries develop their MCC proposals in broad consultation within their society. MCC teams then work in close partnership to help countries refine a program.
  • Country-led implementation: MCC administers the Millennium Challenge Account (MCA). When a country is awarded a compact, it sets up its own local MCA accountable entity to manage and oversee all aspects of implementation. Monitoring of funds is rigorous and transparent, often through independent fiscal agents.

MCC forms partnerships with some of the world’s poorest countries, but only those committed to:

  • good governance,
  • economic freedom,
  • and investments in their citizens.

MCC provides these well-performing countries with large-scale grants to fund country-led solutions for reducing poverty through sustainable economic growth.  MCC grants complement other U.S. and international development programs.There are two primary types of MCC grants: compacts and threshold programs.

  • Compacts are large, five-year grants for countries that pass MCC’s eligibility criteria.
  • Threshold Programs are smaller grants awarded to countries that come close to passing these criteria and are firmly committed to improving their policy performance.

What is MCC achieving?

MCC has approved over $8.4 billion in compact and threshold programs worldwide that support country-determined projects in such sectors as:

  • agriculture and irrigation,
  • transportation (roads, bridges, ports),
  • water supply and sanitation,
  • access to health,
  • finance and enterprise development,
  • anticorruption initiatives,
  • land rights and access,
  • access to education.

The aggressive implementation of compacts and threshold programs is promoting growth opportunities, opening markets, raising the standard of living, and creating a more prosperous future for some of the world’s poorest people:

  • More than 148,000 farmers have been trained and more than 82,000 hectares of land are under production.
  • More than 4,900 kilometers of roads are under design, and road construction is underway.
  • Over $65 million has been disbursed in agricultural loans.

MCC is managed by a chief executive officer, who is part of the nine-member Board of Directors. The Secretary of State, the Secretary of the Treasury, the U.S. Trade Representative, and the USAID Administrator serve on the board along with four private sector representatives.

Funding Opportunities