Updated Jan 16, 2018

Printing Out Disability

https://www.cbmcanada.org/

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Leveraging 3D Printing Technology for Prosthetics Production in Uganda

Building on extensive research and development led by Dr. Matt Ratto at the University of Toronto, the cbm Canada project uses a 3D printer to make a precision-fitted plastic socket to connect a child’s residual limb and a standard artificial leg provided by aid agencies.
How does your innovation work?
Now, a next-generation “Sense” scanner. rotated in an arc around a leg stump for 45 se...
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Building on extensive research and development led by Dr. Matt Ratto at the University of Toronto, the cbm Canada project uses a 3D printer to make a precision-fitted plastic socket to connect a child’s residual limb and a standard artificial leg provided by aid agencies.
How does your innovation work?
Now, a next-generation “Sense” scanner. rotated in an arc around a leg stump for 45 seconds, is used that, in tandem with inexpensive Skanect software, recreates the residual limb virtually. After scanned, a 3D printer then produces the custom-fitted socket using about $3 of cornstarch-based PLA plastic.
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Stage 2: Research & Development

Step one required a digital image of a child's limb: early efforts involved a $200 Xbox scanner accessory, which follows a player’s physical movements. The scanner breakthrough was enabled when Dr. Ryan Schmidt of Autodesk Research enhanced a software program he created (while he was a University of Toronto student) called Meshmixer. His adaptation enabled project leaders to create the socket virtually and quickly, using the powerful graphics card in a high-end portable gaming laptop.
Registered in Canadain Canada

Focus Areas:

Health

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Implemented In:

Uganda

UgandaSEE LESS

1
Country Implemented In
Verified Funding
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Planned Goals and Milestones

Since the entire process requires under six hours, the prosthetic sockets can be replaced easily and cheaply as a child amputee quickly grows. By comparison, producing a socket in Uganda today currently involves five to six labour-intensive days and the use of plaster of Paris molds dried in the sun, often resulting in ill-fitting sockets, the discomfort of which discourages their use.
Under the management of Mitch Wilkie and Emily Kere, the project team will experiment with techniques for 3D printing the wall of the socket to provide the greatest strength and durability with the least material. They will also evaluate the potential use of 3D printers that may be better purposed for this application in the developing world. The team will incorporate good development principles by ensuring disability inclusion, gender equity and environmental sustainability.

Milestone

Oct 2014
Date Unknown
Created
Date Unknown
New Country Implemented In
Uganda