Updated Jan 16, 2018

Kevin Villagran

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The Samburu Project’s primary focus is to provide clean, safe drinking water as a foundation for further development due to the Samburu People facing chronic drought conditions. In 2016, The Samburu Project is embarking upon its 11th round of well drilling, aiming to deliver 12 new wells to the communities of Samburu. The total cost of for year one of this initiative is $240,000. Each well cost...
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The Samburu Project’s primary focus is to provide clean, safe drinking water as a foundation for further development due to the Samburu People facing chronic drought conditions. In 2016, The Samburu Project is embarking upon its 11th round of well drilling, aiming to deliver 12 new wells to the communities of Samburu. The total cost of for year one of this initiative is $240,000. Each well costs $20,000 and will provide clean, safe drinking water to approximately 1,000 people per well.
How does your innovation work?
The Samburu Project’s initiatives begin with community development. Once the benefitting communities have been identified, mobilized and forged a partnership with the organization, The Samburu Project works with a hydrogeologist and drilling company to survey, drill and complete the wells. Community needs assessments are conducted to determine the optimal location and set of strategies for individual communities. The hydrogeologist will recommend locations based on his hydrologic survey of the area. GPS coordinates of these locations will be mapped against preexisting water points and population characteristics. This will enable The Samburu Project to strategize the best drilling points. The Samburu Project is careful to minimize the environmental impact of its wells. This is done by carefully examining other water points in the area to ensure that aquifers are not exhausted. Wells are strategically located next to dry riverbeds so seasonal rains recharge the aquifers. The Samburu Project partners with beneficiary communities to foster community ownership of the wells. The organization provides funds to pay for the drilling and installation of wells. The community is responsible for unskilled labor and primary resource supplies (sand, rocks, etc.). Once the well has been installed, The Samburu Project helps monitor for use and breakages. The community is responsible for repairs, raising funds for replacement parts and major breakages. The wells are drilled to a depth of 70 meters and reach directly to the water table to ensure that the water is clean and free of disease vectors. As part of their contract, all well communities are required to participate in an initial hygiene and sanitation workshop, including point-of-use training, immediately following drilling. The Samburu Project holds periodic crossover training in which representatives from successful projects relay their knowledge to others.
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Stage 5: Scaling

The Samburu Communities of Kenya
Registered in United Statesin United States

Focus Areas:

Infectious & Vector Diseases and Sanitation

Infectious & Vector Diseases and SanitationSEE LESS

Implemented In:

Kenya

KenyaSEE LESS

72,000
Lives Impacted to Date
1
Country Implemented In
$135,000
Funds Raised to Date

Planned Goals and Milestones

We will continue to drill new wells for Samburu Communities that still do not adequate access to clean water. We plan to drill 10-12 new wells in the next year.
Funding Goal240,000
Projected Cumulative Lives Impacted72,000

Milestone

Date Unknown
Created
Date Unknown
New Country Implemented In
Kenya
Date Unknown
Lives Impacted
72,000