Updated Mar 28, 2019

Catalytic Financing for Hepatitis Elimination in Low-Income Countries

www.cdafound.org

Rick Dunn

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Partnering with government and global NGOs for universal healthcare demonstration - showing that small up front investments can catalyze much larger, scalable and sustainable health system programs in low-income countries and repay investors at end.

Data show that even in low income countries, a majority of the population can afford to pay for treatment if drug prices and program costs are kept low. A small loan or grant is used to purchase a first round of hepatitis medicines and diagnostics. These licensed and quality-assured medical interventions have been procured at significantly discounted prices via the Global Procurement Fund, a ...
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Data show that even in low income countries, a majority of the population can afford to pay for treatment if drug prices and program costs are kept low. A small loan or grant is used to purchase a first round of hepatitis medicines and diagnostics. These licensed and quality-assured medical interventions have been procured at significantly discounted prices via the Global Procurement Fund, a non-profit, pooled procurement fund. Supply chain and government agreements ensure minimal markups and keep the prices to the patient below the World Bank-calculated catastrophic healthcare expenditure (CHE) limit. A small markup is charged to 80% of patients while still keeping the total cost below the CHE and significantly lower than current healthcare system costs. This markup pays for all screening and diagnostics, pays for medicines for 20% of patients who cannot afford treatment, pays for other programatic costs, and repays the initial up front investment.
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Stage 4: Transition to Scale

Pilot program aims to screen 250,000 people for Hep B, Hep C and HIV, and treat ~21,500 infected hepatitis patients. Diagnostics and medicines have been purchased, healthcare worker training is scheduled, program starts Apr 2019 in Tashkent.

Focus Areas:

Infectious & Vector Diseases, Financial Sector & Investment and Health Systems

Infectious & Vector Diseases, Financial Sector & Investment and Health SystemsSEE LESS

Implemented In:

Uzbekistan

UzbekistanSEE LESS

4
Key Partners
1
Country Implemented In
250,000
Customers
12
Employees
$300,000
Funds Raised to Date

Problem

1.4 million people die each year - one every 22 seconds - from Hepatitis. Hepatitis is one of the leading causes of liver cancer. Cures exist for HepC and vaccines exist for HepB. Most of these deaths are entirely preventable. Medicine prices have dropped dramatically in recent years, and despite WHO's effort to eliminate hepatitis globally by 2030, only 12 countries are currently on track to do. Most have taken no action, lacking the funds to finance programs.

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Solution

Eliminating hepatitis has been shown to have a positive ROI in all countries studied, including low income countries. Yet large global donors who have funded HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria programs are not funding hepatitis elimination. Most countries cannot afford traditional loans. The catalytic financing pilot aims to show that relatively small up front loans can catalyze much larger, scalable and sustainable health initiatives, benefitting countries socially and financially.

Target Beneficiaries

Globally, the beneficiaries include the 360,000,000 people infected with hepatitis B and C, most notably the 1,400,000 people who die each year (more than from HIV/AIDS) from a preventable, treatable disease. National governments benefit by reducing morbidity and mortality and reducing health care expenditure permanently (due to cures) without reliance on grants or donations, which are not forthcoming.

Mission and Vision

If successful, the Uzbekistan pilot program will not only save over 21,000 lives during the 12-month duration, it will validate an alternative financing mechanism that can be scaled and applied at a national level in all countries, including low-income countries. It can be a model that would enable true Universal Healthcare and realistically advance efforts to achieve Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

Competitive Advantage

Currently, there are NO innovations making these life saving medicines available to infected patients in low-income countries. HIV/AIDS, TB and Malaria have all relied on massive grants or donations to fund treatment programs. It is widely accepted that these donors will not be contributing to hepatitis elimination programs. The advantage of the catalytic funding program is that it enables countries to overcome the up-front funding challenge - without reliance on grants, donations or massive loans - and ultimately benefit financially by eliminating hepatitis and permanently liberating the health system funds that today go to treat cirrhosis, liver cancer and other liver-related disease.

Planned Goals and Milestones

The pilot program will begin in Tashkent in April, 2019. We will begin general screening of up to 250,000 people and immediately begin treating patients for hepatitis B and C.
Funding Goal700,000
Projected Cumulative Lives Impacted250
New Implemented CountriesUzbekistan

Milestone

Apr 2019
New Country Implemented In
Uzbekistan
Mar 2019
Recognition ReceivedPENDING
Oct 2018
Key Partnership
Government
ORGANIZATIONUzbekistan Research Institute of Virology
Apr 2018
Key Partnership
Implementation
ORGANIZATIONFIND (Foundation for Innovative New Diagnostics)
Apr 2018
Key Partnership
Implementation
ORGANIZATIONWorld Hepatitis Alliance
Feb 2018
Created

Supporting Materials

CDA-Foundation-Catalytic-Financing-for-Hepatitis-Elimination-Pilot-Program.pdf